My 2017 Youth Exchange Experience in Nepal by Jenna Douglas

 

In my time getting to learn more about the fantastic place I traveled to, someone referred to your country as a place of beauty and peace. It was a description that I quickly agreed with, yet after spending 11 days in Nepal I don’t believe even these words can do your country a justice. My life-changing visit to this place makes me feel that nothing can accurately describe how special this nation is.

Upon my first moments in Nepal we were encountered with love from the Rotaract crew from Kathmandu. They took all of our worries off of our shoulders with assisting us with luggage, food, water and a safe travel to Pokhara. Immediately I was shown some of the greatest hospitality in my life. Even with the enthusiasm the group shared whilesinging songs on the bus trip was enough to raise my spirits. After a long journey to our destination, we arrived and was once more greeted by some of the nicest people I had ever met. The beautiful scarfs and flowers we were given made me feel like royalty. It was treatment that continued throughout the entire trip and made me feel like I had hit the jackpot, lucky enough to land a spot on this trip.Out of all of the things of the fantastic things on the trip that made it so memorable, it was the love received from our new friends that stood out for me.

After becoming accustomed to the friendliness that I was surrounded by I was then equally impressed by the dedication I saw by my friends. Each Rotaractor took time off of their busy lives to make it a point to welcome us and share their beautiful country with us. It amazed me that even with a busy school or work schedule, they still showed commitment to their organization and made time for their guests. The effort was continued in their service to the community. It amazed me to see how much work they did to serve others that needed it the most. I was so honored to have had the opportunity to distribute stationary supplies to disadvantaged children, and provide them with a new source of happiness. I also enjoyed working with the Asha project helping contribute to necessary earthquake relief in construction, and improving a local park in Kathmandu. These were great opportunities to make a small difference in the lives of others, yet the service we did was incomparable what these Rotaract groups have achieved.

What really touched me was how easy it was for all of the people of Nepal to do it. Not once did I hear a complaint and continuously saw smiles on everyone’s faces. The enuthisuam your groups displayed was awesome, and very different from what I was used to in America. You have inspired me to live with a better attitude and become more active in my local area.

I cannot thank both the Rotaract New Road Pokhara and Rotaract of Kathmandu enough for helping make my trip the best one of my life. If it wasn’t for you guys, I am not sure I believe I would have been able to appreciate your land has to offer. Thanks for treating strangers as your own and building life lasting friendships. You live in a beautiful country that offers not only peace and beauty but compassion, hospitality and love.

Stony Brook School’s Student Leadership Team Sends Message of HOPE to their peers in Nepal

 

4th grade Leadership CouncilMembers of Stony Brook School’s 4th and 5th grade Leadership Councils participated in an outreach project spanning across the globe. Supporting the Branchburg Rotary’s ASHA Project, an initiative that “provide(s) HOPE in all aspects of life by supporting initiatives that are run by the people of Nepal for the people of Nepal”, the leadership DSC_9165members spearheaded the “Flags of Hope” project in which they led their classmates in creating flags that sent messages of hope to their peers in Nepal. On the flags were written the word “ASHA” (which means “HOPE” in Nepali) and words of encouragement. asha2These flags will hang in newly constructed homes and schools. The Leadership Councils also organized a school supply drive. The decorated box, filled with over 100 flags and school supplies will travel with Branchburg Rotary President, Dr. Maharjan in February on the group’s humanitarian mission to Nepal. We are so excited to support the Branchburg Rotary in this wonderful endeavor!

Love without borders: Branchburg to Nepal.

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School supplies distribution 2017

Times have not changed in Nepal, many families can not offered to purchase school supplies. This is not new for Dr. Tulsi Maharjan, who grew up in Nepal before coming to the United States in the 1970s. He remembers the excitement of a new pencil for school. Maharjan is now the President of the Branchburg Rotary and Chair of the New Jersey based non-profit group The Asha Project, and will be leading the Rotary’s 2018 humanitarian mission to Nepal from February 12-25, 2018. Before leaving on the mission to assist people in need in Nepal, he is working with local schools and community groups to collect school supplies.

DSCN4456Recently, the leadership Council 4th and 5th grade students of the Stony Brook School in Branchburg decided to send their love and show their compassion by collecting school supplies and wrote messages of “HOPE” for the schoolchildren in Nepal. They pulled together donations from their class and every member of the student council wrote a message with the Nepali word “ASHA” which means hope in Nepali language. These school supplies will be distributed to schoolchildren in Nepal during our mission trip in mid February 2018.

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School supplies distribution in Nepal 2017

In addition to the school supplies like notebooks, boxes of crayons, pencils, erasers, and folders, the Branchburg Rotary donated $1000 toward the purchase of new school bags. The Rotary Club of Branchburg has been helping in Nepal for the past 25 years.
“Individuals from all Rotary members also donated a variety of school supplies that the students or the school could not afford,” Maharjan said. “These supplies will help to make a better learning environment for students in Nepal.”
According to Leadership Council Adviser Ms. Toni Lynn, “The Leadership Council piloted this collection, but I am sure next year we can do it on an even larger scale! Although the box may not be big, it is filled with a lot of friendship and love”.

Maharjan said that students in Nepal are always anxious to receive these gifts of love as he used to be when he was a young student in Nepal.  Students from Nepal will SKYPE with the leadership group in Branchburg where students will have opportunity to  exchange stories and broaden their international understanding,  explore NEW CULTURE, build enduring friendships, establish a foundation for peace and greater understanding and learn about a region’s people, food, languages, customs, and history.

He hopes to continue this project with many other schools to promote Peace and understanding. If you are interested in participating in this program contact us at trm7510@gmail.com or visit http://www.theashaproject.org.

 

 

GIFT OF HOPE FROM THE STONY BROOK LEADERSHIP GROUP TO BE SEND TO NEPAL.

DSC_9164BRANCHBURG — Times have not changed in Nepal, children are still in need of school supplies. This is not new for Dr. Tulsi Maharjan, who grew up in Nepal before coming to the United States in the 1970s. He remembers the excitement of a new pencil for school. Maharjan is now the President of the Branchburg Rotary and Chair of the New Jersey based non-profit group The Asha Project, and will be leading the Rotary’s 2018 humanitarian mission to Nepal from February 12-25, 2018. Before leaving on the mission to assist people in need in Nepal, he is working with local schools and community groups to collect school supplies.

Recently, the leadership group of the fourth and fifth grades of Stony Brook School in Branchburg collected school supplies and wrote messages of HOPE for the schoolchildren in Nepal. They pulled together donations from their class and every member of the student council wrote a message with the Nepali word “ASHA” which means hope. These school supplies will be distributed to schoolchildren in Nepal during the mission.
In addition to the school supplies like notebooks, boxes of crayons, pencils, erasers, and folders, the Branchburg Rotary donated $1000 toward the purchase of new school bags. The Rotary Club of Branchburg has been helping in Nepal for the past 25 years.
“Individuals from all Rotary members also donated a variety of school supplies that the students or the school could not afford,” Maharjan said. “These supplies will help to make a better learning environment for students in Nepal.”
According to Leadership Council Adviser Ms. Toni Lynn, “The Leadership Council piloted this collection, but I am sure next year we can do it on an even larger scale! Although the box may not be big, it is filled with a lot of friendship and love”.
Maharjan believes that the students in Nepal are looking forward to this special gift and students are lucky to receive this special donation. Students from Nepal will SKYPE with the leadership group in Branchburg where the student can have a cultural exchange. He hopes to continue this project for future humanitarian missions.